Murni’s @ SS2

If you are a youngster living around the Klang Valley, you would never have missed this place. For the benefit of those who do not know, Malaysia’s best hang out spot, besides our malls, are the Mamaks. Mamak means the Indian Malay Mixed community. However in plural, Mamaks, it is a sort of only-in-Malaysia charm.

In essence, these are the places where you get cheap food, good food (though possibly unhealthy), similar food in ALL mamaks, (worry not about what to order because we have the entire menu in our heads), 24 hour service, available at every corner of the country, and the best atmosphere to just sit around and, well, talk cock. That’s how Malaysians de-stress after a long, exhausting day of work/study and getting caught in massive traffic jams.

Murni’s is deemed to some as the ‘epitome’ of all mamaks. It is located in SS2, Petaling Jaya, one of the busiest places when it comes to good food. One very interesting characteristic about this place is that the place is HUGE! It occupies two separate shops, both side by side. One furnished with air-condition and the other is your usual adopt-the-Malaysian-weather’s temperature. However, due to its massive popularity, the tables and chairs available for its customers extends through the corridors of the shops. Indeed Murni’s is two shops in the entire row, its table and chairs however, are lined up right outside other shops for the entire row! When first visited by our MFD’s agents, we were indeed shocked! Even more amazing is the fact that ALL the tables and chairs are filled up!

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And rightly so! Here are some pictures of the food we’ve tasted while we were there! Some of their popular food includes:

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Chicken Napoleon. In that roll there, you will discover (and in this order) a layer of beautiful crisp on the outside, a layer of chicken slices, a layer of ham and a nice, fat cheese sausage right in the middle! Say no more, let the your eyes feast on the picture!

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Cheese Naan is a bread made in a tandoor (hot furnace). The cheese here is generous, the portion was huge, the curry were complimentary and for those who prefer less curry, condensed milk (on the right) to be dipped in. For some it’s unhealthy and hence they avoid it. For us, it just brought wholesome-ness to a whole new level!

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Here is the chicken chop! Crisp outer layer, say hello to the tender insides!

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Murtabak – the Indian Pancake with a swirly twist!

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Seafood fried rice, huge flavourful squids, large portions, happy faces!

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The signature Murni’s colourful range of juices in jars. You HAVE to try their ribena with lychee and nata de coco! *Slurrrrrp*

We have come to the conclusion that Murni’s is the extended Mamaks. It is by itself so unique and popular among Malaysians that google map Murni’s or Waze it, you’ll definitely find it! Here are some details to assist you:

SS2 MURNI
53, Jalan SS2/75,
Petaling Jaya, Selangor
Opens until the late hours of the night everyday.

Wait no more, stop tempting yourself with pictures! Go forth, explore it! Savour it! Experience that Malaysian taste!

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Embrace that eating monster within!

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Tang Yuan 汤圆

Tang Yuan is a kind of dessert, they are traditionally eaten during Winter Solstice Festival or Chinese Wedding day. We usually call it “sweet soup ball” in English.

“Gang Kou Tang Yuan”(港口汤圆) is a famous stall in Klang which sells sweet soup ball for years. Originally, they sell sweet soup ball in Port Klang, but now they have branch in different places and it is still very tasty.

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The soup base of sweet soup ball is ginger. There are large tangyuan fulfill with peanut, small tangyuan and mochi.

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26112012212You can choose either you want the big sweet soup balls which fulfill with peanut and sugar or small sweet balls without any filling or you can mix both! Majority will choose the mixture sweet soup balls.

Address 1: 112,Jalan Pekan Baru, Kawasan 17,Off Jalan Meru, Klang, 41050, Klang, Selangor, 41150
016-229 3710Address 2: Restaurant HoBee, Bandar Bukit Tinggi 2, 41200 Klang.

Business Hours: 8pm-1030pm (except Sunday)

 

 

 

PICCADILLY, SECTION 14

Piccadilly Restaurant is a place where you can chill and hang out with friends and family. Besides its nice atmosphere, it also provides a great variety of dishes which was what amazed me the most. The wide variety of dishes they provide ranges from malay, chinese, indian, western, thai and the list goes on. Their menu also includes many different types of desserts and drinks.

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This is the Rendang Chicken Rice that we tried, it costs RM6.90. The portion was reasonable and it tasted quite good. It may not have been the best one I’ve tasted so far but it is pretty decent.

10799582_10204019978072245_1636423705_nWe also ordered the vegetarian mamak noodle for RM5.90. The portion may have been a little small but it tasted good. This is not the only vegetarian dish that they serve there. In fact, their menu includes many other vegetarian dishes.

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As a snack, we ordered the twister fries which cost RM4.90. Once i started eating it, i couldn’t stop eating it.  It is unique and tasted so good. The price is reasonable as they serve a large portion. If you are finding somewhere to chill and have a small snack, this is the place to go!

The restaurant is always pack at night! Their prices are reasonable for the food they provide, definitely a restaurant to check out.

Adress: LG006 & LG007,
Millennium Square, Dataran Millennium PJ,
98, Jalan 14/1, 46100 Petaling Jaya.LG006 & LG007, Millennium Square Jalan 14/1
46200 Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

Contact Info
Tel: (+603) 7960 5886

Beef Noodles @ New Seaview Restaurant

Beef noodle soup is a Chinese noodle soup made of stewed or red braised beef, beef broth, vegetables and Chinese noodles. Some history behind this cuisine:  it was first created by the Hui people (a Chinese Muslim ethnic group) during the Tang Dynasty of China. The red braised beef noodle soup was invented by the veterans in Kaoshiung, Taiwan who fled from mainland China during the Chinese civil war.

After this article was published in the local newspaper, The Star, our MFD’s agent decided it is a MUST TRY. And so, there went the brave little reporter to New Seaview at Paramount Garden, Petaling Jaya for the tasting adventure!

Boy oh boy, it was good!

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Beef Noodle! The broth was so flavorful! It was perfectly balanced, with just the right amount of herbs and intensity. One sip and you won’t be able to control your actions, one spoon leads to another. The meat was incredibly tender. Our MFD’s agent swore she had never tasted beef this tender, every bite feels like it could melt in your mouth. The noodles however was a little bit of a let down, it felt a little too springy. However on the overall basis, it was a fantastic dish!

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Just another picture from another angle to make you feel the love 🙂

Though this bowl of noodle cost RM7.00, which is rather expensive considering the location. However, beef noodles tend to be a little pricier compared to your normal Kueh Teow Soup or Curry Mee, and our little MFD’s agent says it was worth every penny!

New Seaview coffeeshop (GPS N 03°06’37.3” E 101°37’38.0”) is located off Jalan 20/7 in Petaling Jaya and is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

The Home Cooking Dishes @Sungai Way SS9

It just has to be my luck that for the second review in the row, it was raining cats, dogs and the occasional elephant.  This was not an exaggeration; we experience two blackouts, water overflowing into the restaurant, and Thor-styled lightning.  Which does, at least, excuse my lack of pictures in this post.

The place we went to was The Home Cooking Dishes (Yes, that’s the actual name), a small roadside Chinese restaurant where the floor is one meter below road level and the kitchen is in full view approximately two tables away.

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Considering the venue you might expect this place to be cheaper than usual, but the family running THCD are no slouches in business.  People are willing to pay in this restaurant, so the end pricing is somewhere close to a regular ‘chao choy’* restaurant.  Speaking of willingness to pay, some were willing to brave the angintaufan thunderstorm just to eat at this place.  There’s your inelastic demand curve.**

My digressions aside, I’ll reveal beforehand that we had two outstanding dishes, and two rather mediocre ones.  Keeping with the tradition of ‘bad news first’, we will begin with the not-so-good ones.  Hey, if it gets you to read the whole post, why not?

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*ahem* Tofu (RM8.80)

Behold…four…four something (direct translation going on here) tofu.  Despite its name, this dish was special for the sole reason it left no impression on me whatsoever.  Okay I know tofu is supposed to not taste much, but even after all the toppings, I still ended up with the taste of plain tofu.  Which was very meh.

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Stir-fried long beans w/ roast pork (RM11.80)

Our second mediocre dish: long beans stir-fried with roast pork.  I mean, they stir fried it okay and all, and the pork has a decent taste, but its not something a housewife couldn’t whip up at home herself.  Tldr: tastes ok, not restaurant quality.

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Char Siew (RM18)

Enough bad news (for now), let’s take a look at their signature dish, which sure as hell better be good.  Char siew, a Chinese favourite at just about every roast and wantan mee store in the country.  I’ve tasted some really good ones before; fortunately, this one manages to pass the test.

What sets this apart from other char siew is the glazing – caramelized up to the point its slightly hard, allowing for a truly decadent munching experience.  Close your eyes, and you feel as though you’re eating candy instead.  It’s an addictive dish with their own twist.

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Stir-fried kangkung w/ shrimp sauce (RM12.80)

I bet you weren’t thinking of seeing veggies, but truly this to me was the standout dish of the night.  It looks absolutely normal, but a taste of the broth unleashes a heavenly shrimp aroma onto your unsuspecting palette.

It’s so good that I’m ignoring the fact that its way too salty without rice – usually a giant no-no for me.  Yet just eating it with rice makes it one of the best stir fried vegetables I’ve ever tasted.

With such split results, this one is a difficult one to call.  I’d say this place warrants a repeat visit once in a while; they do serve some truly standout dishes.  Just come armed with an umbrella next time, and be prepared to pay what you expect.

*fried vegetables is the direct translation, but generally refers to a Chinese restaurant serving dishes (usually at night)

** the author does not claim that this example is correct, and hopes that his economics lecturer refrains from any sudden urges to fail the author’s exam papers.

Rojak & Cendol

When we talk about Malaysian food, we never resort to restaurants. The gem is usually found in street food, places the rakyat visits frequently, what they consume regularly.

One of such street food is Rojak and Cendol. Allow me to provide some sort of insight on these two cuisines. Rojak contains fried dough fritters, bean curds, boiled potatoes, prawn fritters, hard boiled eggs, bean sprouts, cuttlefish and cucumber mixed with a sweet thick, spicy peanut sauce. Traditionally, Tamil Muslim (Mamak) rojak vendors used modified sidecar motorcycles as preparation counters and to peddle their rojak. These mobile vendors now use modified mini trucks.

Cendol on the other hand is a traditional dessert originating from Southeast Asia. The dessert’s basic ingredients are coconut milk, jelly noodles made from rice flour with green food coloring (usually derived from pandan leaf), shaved ice and palm sugar. Other ingredients such as red beans, glutinous rice, grass jelly, creamed corn, might also be included.

These two cuisines go hand-in-hand. In Malaysia, these two cuisines are sold in mobile trucks (as mentioned), and one of the best Rojak and Cendol in town may be found in Section 17, Rojak Mustaffa (Jalan 17/41A, off Jalan 17/21, Petaling Jaya). Here is the place where you’ll find the most positive reviews on food in the country. The Rojak is just spot on! The kuah was amazing! And that is perhaps the secret to a perfect Rojak. Kuah is the main ingredient here

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Rojak Telur Sotong that tasted like heaven!

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Cendol that was just perfect on a hot afternoon

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Sebagai pinang dibelah dua

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The price of the selections

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Price of the cendol. Customers having their meal on the ‘mock’ table of the truck

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One thing about this place: The people never stopped! The line was never-ending, and people who can’t get seats are contented standing around having their meal!

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The Cendol maker busy at work!

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These two proud Malaysians were one of the many customers at the truck stalls. They were aware of the MFD agents taking pictures for the website, and gave their honest opinion that this Rojak and Cendol should be promoted, and encouraged the work of MFD!

While having the gorgeous meal, our MFD agent noticed that not only the business was going very fast, (Rojak maker never stopped at all), the line never seemed to end, the customers that came to eat were from different cross-sections of the country. All races, whether it was the Malays, the Chinese, the Indians or the Lain-lains just comfortably, unconsciously, and as if it was just the right thing to do, converge at this very stall, right under the shady tree. It truly seemed like everyone belonged here. What was even more touching to the MFD agent is that the cars that parked along the road (belonging to the customers) were cars of all types. Expensive cars along with simple old cars were parked at the same (illegal) area, and all who got down from their cars came to this very place and ordered their (extra besar Rojak Sotong) and left contented. Our agent concludes, and is agreed upon among the members of MFD, that food truly brings us together, that our different background has no significance here, that it is our identity as Malaysians, (who have an eternal love for good food) that truly matters.

Kuih Nyonya?

Nyonya, or the Peranakan, are the terms used for the descendants of the 15th through 17th-century Chinese immigrants to the British Malaya. They are the mixed of the Chinese and Malays, which in turn created one of the best type of cuisine out there! In this post, we shall focus on the ‘kuih’/ traditional cakes of the Baba-Nyonya’s.

Today one of our MFD’s agent visited the market and oh what beauty was found there!

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There it laid, rows and rows of beautiful nyonya kuihs!

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So many varieties, all ranging within RM0.50 to RM2.50

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Bought by many, grew up with many, loved by many.

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Just a picture of flowers to brighten your day! All found in the market!

 

2-18 Jalan Othman,Pj Old Town, 46000 Petaling Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia